Die geheimen Tagebücher von einer verderbten Existenz

Behind these gates you will hear my thoughts screaming like nerves under the sun and feel my emotion laughing to the empty ether.
Welcome Dear Wanderer, make yourself at home.
The road is long and tortuous and I hope you enjoy yourself.

Fraternally Yours,
Poison Creeper

Wednesday, 5 September 2007

Some Velvet Morning




Some velvet mornin' when I'm straight
I'm gonna open up your gate
And maybe tell you 'bout Phaedra
And how she gave me life
And how she made it end
Some velvet mornin' when I'm straight
Flowers growing on a hill, dragonflies and daffodils
Learn from us very much, look at us but do not touch
Phaedra is my name
Some velvet mornin' when I'm straight
I'm gonna open up your gate
And maybe tell you 'bout Phaedra
And how she gave me life
And how she made it end
Some velvet mornin' when I'm straight
Flowers are the things we know, secrets are the things we grow
Learn from us very much, look at us but do not touch
Phaedra is my name Some velvet mornin' when I'm straight
Flowers growing on a hill I'm gonna open up your gate dragonflies and daffodils
And maybe tell you 'bout Phaedra Learn from us very much
And how she gave me life look at us but do not touch FADE
And how she made it end

- Lee Hazelwood - Nancy Sinatra -
1967

later
Lydia Lunch + Rowland S Howard on a 12" sinlge I fell in Love with a Ghost/Some Velvet Morning later released in Honeymoon in Red. 1982


Alexandre CABANEL Phaedra [Phèdre]



In Greek mythology, Phaedra was a legendary character. Details of her tragic story even helped to inspire a play - Hippolytus, which was composed by the great Greek poet and dramatist Euripides. And indeed, it is from this play that we get a sense of the role Phaedra played in myth and legend.
Phaedra was the daughter of King Minos of Crete and his wife Pasiphae. She was therefore the sister of Ariadne. It is interesting to note that both Phaedra and Ariadne were involved with the same man - the hero Theseus. For, some time after Theseus abandoned Ariadne, he married Ariadne's younger sister. Unfortunately, neither of the sisters had a successful relationship with Theseus.
Phaedra had the misfortune of falling in love with Hippolytus, the handsome but chaste son of Theseus and the Amazon Hippolyta. Even though Phaedra was Hippolytus's mother-in-law, this did not prevent her from desiring the young man. In the play Hippolytus, the goddess Aphrodite claims responsibility for making Phaedra the victim of lust. Aphrodite speaks in the prologue:
"Phaedra saw him [Hippolytus]and her heart was filled with the longings of love.This was my work."
As much as Phaedra desires the young man, Hippolytus wants nothing to do with his mother-in-law. Naturally, this doomed relationship is the stuff of tragedy. In the play, Phaedra commits suicide, shamed by her inappropriate - and unreciprocated - passion. However, she leaves a note that blames Hippolytus on the grounds of attempted seduction. When Theseus returns from one of his many journeys, he finds his wife dead, and his son apparently is the cause of her demise. In the end, Hippolytus too is killed.